Spring2017

  • 11
    May

    Those Who Dived

    By: Sarah Todd /   Introduction: The purpose of this project is to investigate the entertainment phenomenon of diving horses that was popular during the late nineteenth to mid-twentieth century, particularly in the United States. I will raise and examine several questions surrounding this phenomenon, including: the genesis of diving horses, theoretical approaches to understanding diving horses, how diving horses ...
  • 11
    May

    Dragons: The Animal Behind The Myth

    By: Joyce Chan /    The word, “Dragon” in Western culture conjures up images of a fire breathing beast, a hoarder of knowledge and treasures. Dragons are likely to be associated with their own slaying by knights in shining armor, seeking to protect a village or rescue maidens from the monster. In Christianity, dragons are viewed as a symbol of ...
  • 9
    May

    Public Piety, Devotion, & Skin: Endangered Species Tattooing as Morally Engaged Media Intervention

    by: Sarah McFarland-Taylor / “Wear your heart on your skin in this life.” – Sylvia Plath, Johnny Panic and the Bible of Dreams As an environmentalist committed to endangered species conservation, what does it mean to “wear your heart” – that which you love most dearly – “on your skin”? For a growing number of tattooed animal advocates, it means ...
  • 9
    May

    The Contemporary Fine Artist’s Representation of the Animal

    By:  Lindsay Hill / www.lindsayalinehill.com   Introduction The first documented human representations of animals date back to 38,000 BCE in Eurasia as cave paintings. The cave paintings were less representative of pets, and more representative of wild animals. As humans became less wild, so did their animals. Slowly, artist representations of animals started to include domesticated animals in addition to ...
  • 9
    May

    Cute Invasion: Reading the Urban Raccoon as Media

    By: Dylan Forest / In New York City’s Central Park, a seemingly novel form of human/animal interaction is developing between humans and raccoons. As reported on in various news sources, these interactions consist of humans hand-feeding and touching urban-dwelling raccoons. This behavior, particularly the close physical proximity involved, is largely cast in news sources as foolish and dangerous behavior by ...
  • 9
    May

    The Feral Not Seen

    By: Oni Yeahia / How do you feel about feral cats? Cats that you never see in daylight but you know that they are lurking in the dark alleyway just waiting for their next prey. If you happen to walk past a feral cat you tend run or walk as fast as you can so that you can avoid they ...
  • 9
    May

    Beautiful Ornaments: Hybrid Animal Taxidermy

      By: Michael Campos / www.michael-campos.com   “I see it as a raw material to work with; with no soul left, the body becomes a beautiful ornament.” – POLLY MORGAN     INTRODUCTION Hybrid Animal Taxidermy has most likely been around since the practice of taxidermy itself. It doesn’t seem too far of a stretch to assume that a taxidermist would ...
  • 9
    May

    Canine Companions: Why do Humans photograph Dogs?

    By: Alexandra Reali / www.alexreali.format.com   Introduction In the beginning of this research analysis, I came up with a collage of images which explored, in a visual sense, the topic of my interest within the greater context of representations of dogs through visual history, both alone and with humans, and the representation of dogs in early photography. The purpose of assembling ...
  • 8
    May

    Animal Symbolism in the Fashion World

    By: Briana Goldman / Animals have always been an essential part of fashion. Our original source of clothing was animal skin and fur, eventually even becoming important enough to be considered status symbols. Keeping them involved in the evolution of clothing, brands often choose animals to represent their brands. Animal symbolism in the fashion world says a lot about a brand ...